There is a lot happening on aquarium patterns lately, with some of the incidents reported just a few days ago. And honestly, if you missed it on the news, chances are you may never have had the opportunity to know. So as a rewind, let’s see what happened this week: the 3 happenings you missed on the news.

This week, unwanted about 600 unwanted goldfish have found refuge in an aquarium in Paris, France, reports Andrea Romano on their website Travel Leisure.

600 Unwanted Pet Goldfish Have Found a New Home at the Paris Aquarium

Goldfish in Paris are getting a second chance to just keep swimming, even after their owners kick them out of their tiny fish bowl homes. According to Reuters, the Paris Aquarium has been taking in the unwanted goldfish who can no longer live with their humans, no matter the reason. More than 600 goldfish have found sanctuary at the aquarium over the last two years, where they are well taken care of and enjoy much more space to swim around.

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Besides having a home where they can keep swimming, the 600 goldfish receive proper treatment for effective sustainability.

Somewhere in Tokyo, Japan, as reported by Mayuko Ono on Reuter, a lonely dolphin has raised the guts and concern of the public.

Honey the lonely dolphin, abandoned in Japanese aquarium, sparks public outcry

The female bottlenose dolphin, nicknamed Honey, was captured in 2005 near Taiji, a western port town that has become notorious for its annual dolphin hunt that was featured in the Oscar-winning 2009 documentary “The Cove”, media reports say.

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According to the report, the dolphin has been abandoned for almost8 months (start of the year), and the public are calling for the respective party to save the animal.

According to News Channel 9, there is highly likely to be climate change that may affect salamanders.

New aquarium study predicts climate shifts may upset key salamander community

There is a new aquarium study that predicts climate shifts that could potentially upset salamander communities. Thanks to its warm, humid climate and geological stability, the rippled hills of Southern Appalachia have long been a haven for salamanders.

Tennessee Aquarium Conservative Institute says eighty percent of North America’s salamander species live within a 500-mile radius of Chattanooga. East Tennessee and Western North Carolina alone are home to more species than can be found in most countries.

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Not so many people keep salamanders in their fish tank, really. But if you do, you might want to check this story out.

Conclusion

So, what’s with the happening? Simple: they go a long way to show every last one of us the beauty of Aquascaping as an art to take seriously. Because – after all – that’s what fish family and aquarium is all about.

 

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